Tag Archives: doctor

Harry Potter goes to Med School

What if Harry Potter turned in his wand for a stethoscope?  Would he have a great impact on the medical community with his problem solving skills and seemingly inherited intelligence?

If Harry Potter went to Med School, his favourite class would be anatomy and everyone would try to determine what type of scar he had.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-23363-1380005845-6

His friends would have to correct his pronunciation of difficult medical words.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-12725-1380004541-4
anigif_enhanced-buzz-9542-1380004553-10

Harry is humble, so he wouldn’t act like a gunner.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-12968-1379810458-5

He won’t lose courage in the face of difficult exams.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-5186-1379878687-13

Since he loves small spaces, he would probably study in his room instead of a study hall.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-18789-1379754485-29

Harry will also love OB/GYN, it will remind him of the mandrake roots.
mandrake

After a while, he’ll feel how the rest of us feel at med school…
anigif_enhanced-buzz-27291-1379752828-16

He’ll think of Dumbledore while he’s studying and question why he’s studying medicine in the first place.
anigif_enhanced-buzz-31136-1379809888-13

When he feels like his head is going to explode from all the stress…
anigif_enhanced-buzz-9839-1379811490-27

He’ll talk to his friends about his decision to go to med school…
anigif_enhanced-buzz-18470-1379811633-23

and then he’ll realise he was only meant for the Wizarding World!
anigif_enhanced-buzz-5210-1379752579-12

We’ll miss you Harry, but you are the best wizard we’ve ever known!

Advertisements

What makes a great doctor?

Another debate I was having the other day, what qualities or characteristics make a great doctor?  Typically, if you’re going to the doctor it’s because you’re sick- which isn’t a fun situation.  What are you looking for in a physician?  This is someone you have to confide your deepest health secrets to – you have to be 100% honest with them about your health history so they can treat you properly.  This is the list I came up with:

1).  Knowledgeable/critical thinker
Makes sense, right?

2).  Good listener
If you want a step by step guide on how to be a Good Listener – check out wikihow.  It answers ALL your questions…*giggle*

3).  Current
I want a doctor who is up on the latest procedures, news, research, etc.  There is new “stuff” coming out all the time and it’s important that they stay up to date!

4).  Calming disposition
If you’re about to tell someone bad news, I’m hoping you’ll have the right tone of voice, demeanor and overall body language.

5).  Empathetic
A doctor who attempts to understand how the patient feels and what they are going through is a powerful thing.  

6).  Great communication skills
DUH!  This is a given.

7).  Professionalism
Doctor-patient relationship is essential.  You need to have a certain level of trust built with your patients – so they know their information will NOT leave your office.  

8).  Educator
This was a big one for me.  I often find that patients don’t understand what the are suffering from, what the diagnosis was, if it’s serious, how to take their medication, etc.  This stems from not being properly educated by their physician.  This is also partially the patient’s fault as well – if they aren’t asking questions the doctor assumes they understand.  Which ultimately refers back up to #6.

Do you embody all of these characteristics in your professional life?

If you can think of anything I missed – please comment below!!

 

What inspires students to become doctors?

I was having a debate with someone the other day about what it is that motivates students to continue with another 4-8 years of schooling.  We compiled a list of possible reasons… if you can think of any more, post them below!!  Or if you have a personal story – I’d love to hear it!!

1).  Wanting to make a difference in people’s lives.

2).  Wanting to make the next big discovery.

3).  Love for science

4).  Fascination with how the human body works.

5).  Parents are doctors.

6).  Mentor or friend convinced them.

7).  Family issue inspired them.

8).  You carried out volunteer work at a hospital.

9).  You had  early insight through a medically related school project.

For some people, they have always known that they wanted to be a doctor, for others, such as myself, my path was much more twisted and filled with obstacles.  If you want to read about my path, click here.

Doc, could you take a look at my rash?

Even though I am not a doctor yet, I still receive medically related questions from people I barely know.  At local restaurants, the post office, the launder mat or even walking around town, med students like me stand out in the crowd!   I have been asked to look at, and I’ve actually seen and heard about, all sorts of bumps, rashes, and skin discolorations.  Honestly, more than you’d believe.  I also get consulted on different types of aches, pains, and any number of other bodily discomforts.  The limitations of my current medical credentials allow me at best to “prescribe” sunblock, hand cream or some kind of over the counter treatment the inquirer must select on their own!  In my “spare time” because my medical insights are so valuable, I’ve thought about setting up a mobile street medicine shop which I can advertise by walking around wearing a sign that says “will diagnose your ailment for food!”  Like most of my peers, I am just a poor med student with student loan debt up to my ears!

I can honestly say it is good practice for me to have people talk to me and tell me about their different problems.  I have made feeble attempts to explain their troubles and make small suggestions, but I always emphasize the fact that I am not a doctor . . . yet.  I suppose I know more than the typical non-medical person, so I may seem like an authority, but ultimately I have a ways to go.

So each time someone approaches me for a “street diagnosis”, the best advice I can give, after I remind them that I am not a doctor, is for them to go see a doctor!